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Climate

Bermuda has a very mild climate, due to the influence of the Gulf Stream, but it is not a tropical paradise, at least in winter. 
Summer in Bermuda is hot and muggy, with highs around 30 °C (86 °F) in July and August, although the heat is tempered by the breeze. There are about 10/12 days of rain per month, but usually in this season the rain comes in the form of short and intense showers and thunderstorms, which break out in the evening and do not affect much the sunshine amount. 

In winter, from November to March, temperatures are very mild, with lows around 15/17 °C (59/63 °F) and highs around 20/22 °C (68/72 °F). Sometimes the weather is nice and the sun shines, but this kind of weather is not always guaranteed: in fact there is no shortage of rainfall, so much so that there are about 11/13 rainy days per month, and there can be windy days as well. 

The best time to visit Bermuda is in April & May. Having a favorable climate, Bermuda can be visited all year round, in winter to relax, play sports or explore nature, in summer for swimming and sunbathing. In summer, there's some risk of hurricanes. All in all, April and May seem to be the best months, especially May, at least with regard to weather conditions, since it's still a bit cool for swimming: the daytime temperature is around 24 °C (75 °F), while the sea temperature is around 21 °C (70 °F). 


Getting Here

 

L.F. Wade Airport (BDA) is the main airport for international flights

Hamilton City is the main ferry terminal, with stops at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Watford Bridge, Cavello Bay, St George's Town, Southampton, Somerset Bridge and a few more

 

Book your flights to Bermuda


Good to know

 
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BIKES
With its long winding roads and steep hills, Bermuda is an ideal playground for cyclist. If you like the idea of cycling around the island but are not excited about the idea of struggling up-hill, most bike rental companies now offer hybrid electric bicycles, an eco-friendly way of getting a little push when you need it! When enquiring about renting a bike, make sure to ask for a "pedal bike", or you will end up with a motor scooter!

SCOOTERS
Adopt the Bermudan way of getting around, a fun, effortless and inexpensive to freely explore the island. Cycle liveries to contact for both bikes and scooters include: Oleander Cycles, Elbow Beach Cycles, Eve's Cycle Livery, and Smatt's Cycle Liveries. Most of these companies have outlets throughout the island and are happy to deliver direct to your hotel.

BUSES
If the idea of renting a bike or scooter doesn't appeal to you, you'll be pleased to know that Bermuda offers great public transport services, covering a large part of the island and most of its points of interest via 11 bus routes and 14 bus zones. Most buses leave from Hamilton City's Central Terminal, next to the City Hall. Bus stops are recognisable by their pink or blue topped poles, where pink tops signal bus routes inbound to Hamilton, and blue tops signal routes outbound of Hamilton.

FERRIES
To break from the public transport boredom, jazz it up with a public ferry trip around the island. All ferries depart from Hamilton City's Ferry Terminal on Front Street, and fall within four colour-coded routes. Blue: stops at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Watford Bridge and Cavello Bay, all in Sandys Parish, on the western side of Bermuda. Orange: this route operates during the summer season only, and stops at the Royal Naval Dockyard before carrying on to St George's Town. Pink: several stops in Paget and Warwick Parishes. Green: stops at Rockaway in Southampton Parish, as well as Somerset Bridge in Sandys Parish.

TAXIS
Taxis are mostly found near the airport, in the capital, in St George's town, at the Royal Naval Dockyard, or outside the island's main hotels. All taxis are metered at government-set rates.


History of Bermuda

Arawak Indians were the first to live on Barbados, but the Caribs who invaded from Venezuela drove the Arawaks away by 1200 A.D. before they dissipated to neighbouring islands ahead of English settlers arriving on the islands. Whilst the exact reasons for the Caribs leaving Bermuda is unknown, some claim that Spanish slavers that drove them away.

Click here to read the full history!